Schildfinder (German PlateFinder) 2.0 released

Yesterday the App Store approved version 2.0 of Deutscher Schildfinder (German PlateFinder), released in both German and English. (For iOS devices with German as the primary language, the app appears in German (named Schildfinder); for other languages, the app uses English and is called German PlateFinder.

Continue reading Schildfinder (German PlateFinder) 2.0 released

Watch for the iPad Version of German PlateFinder

Six months have passed since I promised that the new version of German PlateFinder would be released by the end of 2015. Well (like so many software projects), it is late.

The new version is up and running with a Master/View  Controller (where, in landscape mode, the list of codes/places appear on the left and the maps/web pages appear on the right). It runs on all sizes of iPads and on the “plus” iPhone versions. (It might even run on the smaller iPhones and iPods.)

Hopefully it will be out within the next few months.

Apologies for the delay!

—W.W.

What’s Coming Next?

In case you’re wondering what’s next from us, we’ll mention in general terms what to expect:

  1. By the end of 2015 we hope to release a new German PlateFinder with expanded capabilities.
  2. Shortly thereafter, look for yet another app–this one not a PlateFinder.

That’s all we can say at the moment.

More later …

All PlateFinders Updated during Previous Month

During the month of August, iAppWriters updated all the PlateFinders. Here is what we did to the U.S. state PlateFinders:

  • Updated the apps to the iOS 7 “look” (just in time for iOS 8 to be released in September).
  • Improved the legibility of the introduction page (viewed by touching “Intro” or “Erklärung” buttons on the main page) by adding full support for HTML5.
  • Fixed minor bugs

Continue reading All PlateFinders Updated during Previous Month

Updated German PlateFinder (Deutscher Schildfinder) Released Today

Release 1.5.1 of German PlateFinder (Deutscher Schildfinder for devices with primary language set to German) was released today.

This version increases the 408 license plate codes to 668. The majority of the new codes are for cities and towns that have their own license plate prefixes.
Please submit requests for additional codes and enhancements to apps@iappwriters.com
We hope you enjoy the new version!

More Codes for the German PlateFinder/Deutscher Schildfinder

During the past year we’ve received periodic reports about missing license plate codes. We’ve responded by adding those codes.

This month we decided to dig deeper so look for additional codes.
We’ve found a large number of additional codes, and are currently adding them to the App. (We’re currently adding new codes that begin with “H”.)  Hopefully you’ll see a new version of the App within the next two weeks or so.
Thanks for feedback about the German PlateFinder (Deutscher Schildfinder on iOS devices with German as the default language). It is our most popular “PlateFinder”–by far. (The German language version of the App has more downloads than all other PlateFinders combined.)

German PlateFinder/Deutscher Schildfinder for iPad

Last week a new version of the bilingual German PlateFinder – Deutscher Schildfinder appeared on the iOS App Store. This is the first iPad version of our most popular app for identifying license plates–in Germany. (During the past six months, customers have downloaded more German PlateFinder apps than all our other PlateFinders together! … and most of the downloads are the German-language version.)

The Montana PlateFinder is our second most popular PlateFinder. Watch for a new version of that app “real soon now.”

Search Bar for German PlateFinder/Deutscher Schildfinder

Note the new search bar at the top of the screen

The German PlateFinder (also available in German as Deutscher Schildfinder to iOS devices with German as their default language) now sports a search bar! Hopefully this will help you locate that elusive license plate code that defies discovery! (The German PlateFinder has more than 400 codes found on present-day license plates in Germany.)

Continue reading Search Bar for German PlateFinder/Deutscher Schildfinder

Ohio PlateFinder Released Today

Today Ohio PlateFinder (the seventh in the PlateFinder series) was released to the iPhone App Store

We hope you enjoy it.

The Ohio PlateFinder was created as the direct result of an email received August 6, asking about a PlateFinder for Ohio. Thanks for your query!!

If you are aware of other states or regions that use locale codes in their plates, feel free to contact us at apps@appwriters.com. Your favorite PlateFinder might be the next!

Visit Ohio PlateFinder in the App Store.

All Apps Updated for iPhone 5

All our apps now support the iPhone 5’s larger display! Be sure to update them if you own earlier versions.

Additionally, we’ve fixed autorotation bugs in the South Dakota and Montana PlateFinders. Let us know if you find other bugs.
We’re working on a new app. (We’ll let you know when it is released …)

German PlateFinder / Deutscher Schildfinder Released This Week

Three days ago our latest iPhone app in the “PlateFinder” series appeared in the iPhone App Store. The German PlateFinder (Deutscher Schildfinder in German) is our most aggressive undertaking thus far. Here are a few highlights:

  • If your iOS device’s default language (in Settings) is German, the entire app appears in German. For other languages, the interface defaults to English
  • All 451 of the current location codes that appear on German license plates appear in the app.
  • In order to facilitate the location of a given code, an index appears at the right-hand side of the main view.
  • (Yes, there are plans to add a search bar at the top of the main view, to facilitate searches for specific locations and codes.)
  • Like our other PlateFinder apps, this one is free.
This is our first venture in internationalized apps. Please send suggestions, feedback, complaints and bug reports to apps@iappwriters.com.

Wyoming PlateFinder 1.1 Released Today

Version 1.1 of Wyoming PlateFinder appeared in Apple’s App Store today. It sports two enhancements:

  1. On the opening list of codes, counties and county seats, touching the (Sort by) County seat button in the lower right-hand corner will enlarge the county seat line in the list entries. This should make it more apparent that the entries are arranged by county seat name.
  2. The opening launch screen now has a high-resolution version. The icon that appears on the main screen will also appear in higher resolution on capable devices.

Additional versions of Wyoming PlateFinder (and the other PlateFinders) are coming soon.

Thank You, Steve Jobs! We Miss you!

It was raining outside when we received the news that Steve Jobs passed away today. Thanks, Steve, for your contributions to our lives through your innovative creativity at Apple!

It was good to see you at WWDC in June. We missed you at the iPhone announcement two days ago. We’ll continue to miss you.

Best wishes … until we meet again!

Alabama PlateFinder

Released this past week, Alabama PlateFinder is the 5th in our series of iPhone Apps for states that use license plate prefixes to  identify the county that issued the plate.

Alabama began using numeric license plate prefixes in 1955. Codes 1 through 3 correspond to the three most populous counties in 1955: Jefferson County (county seat Birmingham), Mobile County (county seat Mobile), and Montgomery County (county seat Montgomery–the state capital). The remaining 64 codes are assigned to counties alphabetically. The motto “Heart of Dixie” has appeared on most Alabama license plates since 1955, and a heart has appeared somewhere on the plate.

It is worth noting that St. Clair County has two county seats. (It is the only county with two fully functional county seats–at least, in the five PlateFinder apps released so far.)

Visit Alabama PlateFinder in the iPhone Apps Store.

We hope you enjoy Alabama PlateFinder. Send feedback, requests and suggestions to apps@iappwriters.com.

Montana PlateFinder

Montana PlateFinder is the 4th in our series of iPhone Apps for states that use license plate prefixes to  identify the county that issued the plate.

Montana has been using county license plate prefixes since 1936.  Numbers were assigned to counties based on population in about 1930, from most populous (Silver Bow County–county seat: Butte) to least populous (Lincoln County–county seat: Libby). (The codes first used in 1936 are still used today, even though the population rankings have changed.) If you know the county numbers, you can identify the county that issued most Montana plates. (Exceptions include personalized and special issue plates, for example.)

On many of the plates, a silhouette of a bison skull separates the county prefix from the remainder of the plate number. The county number is frequently followed immediately by an alphabetic letter.

Visit Montana PlateFinder in the iPhone Apps Store.

We hope you enjoy Montana PlateFinder. Send feedback, requests and suggestions to apps@iappwriters.com.

South Dakota PlateFinder

South Dakota is another of the handful of states whose license plate numbers have prefixes that identify the county that issued the plates.

The present-day prefixes have been used since 1987. The same codes were also used during the years 1956-1975.

In 1956 the nine most populous counties were assigned numbers 1-9, beginning with Minnehaha County, the most populous. The other counties–arranged alphabetically–received codes 10 through 64.

Three additional counties were asigned numbers 65-67:

  1. Shannon County (adjacent to and east of Fall River County) is one of two counties with no county seat. Fall River County’s county seat, Hot Springs, serves as Shannon County’s administrative center.
  2. Washabaugh County was dissolved on January 1, 1983 and merged with neighboring Jackson County on the north. Apparently Bennett County (to the south) continues to issue plates with prefix 66 to vehicles owned by residents who live in the area that was previously Washabaugh County. (Prefix 66 isn’t currently represented by South Dakota PlateFinder.)
  3. Todd County (adjacent to and west of Tripp County) is the other county with no county seat. Winner, the county seat of Tripp County, serves as Todd County’s administrative center.

South Dakota PlateFinder was written to help you learn about South Dakota by reading the codes at the beginning of license plates you encounter while travelling in South Dakota and elsewhere. The app shows where each county is located. It also links to additional information about each county and its county seat.

Students of South Dakota history will appreciate South Dakota PlateFinder as they study South Dakota and memorize and review its counties.

(Note: Besides the prefixes used 1956-1975 and 1987-present, South Dakota has had several other schemes, dating back to 1925. Those schemes are beyond the present scope of South Dakota PlateFinder)

Visit South Dakota PlateFinder in the iPhone App Store.

We hope you enjoy South Dakota PlateFinder! Send requests, suggestions and feedback to apps@iappwriters.com.

Wyoming PlateFinder

In 1930, the state of Wyoming adopted the license plate numbering scheme still in use today: License plates begin with a number in the range 1-23, which identifies the county that issued the plate. Numbers were assigned based on each county’s total property valuation in 1930.

In 1936, Wyoming license plates began to feature the “Bucking Horse” (believed by some to represent a legendary rodeo horse named “Steamboat”–“the horse that couldn’t be ridden”).

Wyoming PlateFinder was created to help you learn about Wyoming by reading the codes at the beginning of license plates you encounter while travelling in Wyoming and elsewhere. The app shows where each county is located. It also links to additional information about each county and its county seat.

Students of Wyoming history will appreciate Wyoming PlateFinder as they study Wyoming and memorize and review its counties.

Visit Wyoming PlateFinder in the iPhone App Store.

Idaho PlateFinder

In 1945, Idaho began using the county license plate prefix designators still in use today. If you know the system, you can identify the county that issued most Idaho plates.

Idaho PlateFinder was created to help you learn about Idaho by reading the codes at the beginning of license plates you see while travelling in Idaho and elsewhere. The app shows where each county is located in the state. It also links to additional information about each county and its county seat.

Students of Idaho history will appreciate Idaho PlateFinder as they study Idaho and memorize and review her counties.

Visit Idaho PlateFinder in the iPhone App Store.

Here We Have Idaho!

Yesterday we uploaded our first iPhone app to Apple’s App Store. Now we’re waiting (with baited breath) for its approval. We’ll announce its approval as soon as we’r notified. In the meantime, here’s a hint: It’s about Idaho. This post takes its title from Idaho’s state song (words by McKinley Helm & Albert J. Tompkins, music by Sallie Hume-Douglas):

You’ve heard of the wonders our land does possess,
It’s beautiful valleys and hills,
The majestic forests where nature abounds,
We love every nook and rill.
[chorus:]
And here we have Idaho
Winning her way to fame.
Silver and gold in the sunlight blaze,
and romance lies in her name.
Singing, we’re singing of you,
Ah, proudly too,
All our lives thru, we’ll go
Singing, singing of you,
Singing of Idaho.
There’s truly one state in this great land of ours
Where ideals can be realized.
The pioneers made it so for you and me,
A legacy we’ll always prize.
[chorus]

Programming the earth, one app at a time